Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS

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Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS

Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS

  • USB Audio Device Class Specification 10
  • USB HID Class Specification 11
  • LED indicators: Microphone-Mute Status, Activity
  • Compliant with USB 20 Full Speed

USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS.Support Windows 98SE / ME / 2000 / XP / Server 2003 / Vista / 7, Linux and Mac OS.

List Price: $ 22.00

Price: $ 6.99

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Originally posted 2015-05-14 09:12:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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3 thoughts on “Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS

  1. 289 of 298 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Strongly recommended as headset adapter for Mac users, January 8, 2010
    By 
    501(c)Geek (San Francisco, CA) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS (Personal Computers)

    This is the platonic form of a USB sound card. It works well in Windows XP and Mac OS X, has clearly labeled inputs, decent build quality, and has no unnecessary features, at a very affordable price. We bought it to use stereo jack headsets with Skype on Mac computers that don’t have microphone jacks, and this adapter fits our needs exactly. This also resolves a problem we have when using Windows XP on our iMacs – Apple doesn’t provide the correct sound drivers in Boot Camp, and the built-in iMac headphone jack doesn’t work in Windows – the USB adapter works perfectly.

    In Mac OS X 10.5 and 10.6 (tested in both) the device is identified as a “C-Media USB Audio Device”. Installation was plug-and-play, the device was immediately recognized after plugging in, although I had to manually select it as the input/output device in the Sound preference pane. After selecting it and setting the input levels, OS X and Skype both automatically switched back and forth between Built-in Audio and C-Media USB when it was plugged/unplugged, and remembered the input levels last used on each (although not the systemwide output levels).

    A sticker on the outside of the box identifies the chipset as the C-Media CM119, and it is a USB 2.0 device.

    Physically, the construction seems plenty robust for a $10 device. The mic and headphone jacks are color coded in standard pink and green, and have large white icon labels that are easily identified. The case is darkly translucent black, and a green LED inside blinks when sound is being transmitted or received, and otherwise glows steady when plugged in but not in active use. It is too thick to plug into the USB ports on the edges of the 2007-2009 silver aluminum iMac keyboards. On our aluminum iMacs it has to be plugged into the back, where it doesn’t block any other ports (as long as other connected USB devices are not also thick). However, it can easily be connected to the USB ports next to the cord on the rear of the older white Mac keyboards from 2003-2007.

    Drawbacks?
    The microphone input is mono, which is fine for voice headsets, but probably not great for pro audio recording, which probably wouldn’t be done with a $10 device anyway. I could do without the blinking light, but as it will be out of sight when connected behind my iMac, it’s not a big deal.

    Comparison
    We also bought the cousin to this product, the 7.1 Channel USB External Sound Card Audio Adapter with external volume control buttons. The 7.1 version uses the same CM119 chipset, but was inferior to this Syba model in all respects.

    – The 7.1 model has a thicker body, making it more likely to block other USB ports.
    – The buttons on the 7.1 feel very flimsy, and are mostly useless as they only change the computer’s software volume settings.
    – The 7.1 inputs are not correctly color coded (yellow and black) and the icon labels are tiny and hard to distinguish.
    – The 7.1 is identified by OS X as “Unknown USB Audio device”
    – The particular 7.1 unit we received was assembled with its USB port slightly angled off-center.

    The only supposed improvements in the 7.1 version are the flaky exterior buttons and that it comes with a mini-CD of Xear “virtual surround sound” software for Windows only. Surely you could use some other “3D sound simulation software” with this Syba unit, and there are several reports of the buttons/housing breaking on the 7.1 version. I strongly recommend avoiding the 7.1 model at all costs, this one is simpler and sturdier.

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  2. 64 of 64 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    AUDIO QUALITY FIXED (Explained How-To), December 6, 2010
    By 
    Kyle170

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS (Personal Computers)

    When this unit came, I plugged it in and the instillation was quick. I noticed that this sounded a bit worse than my cheap laptop’s sound card… Saw other bad reviews and thought something was up… after some tinkering, I found that the fix to set the sound quality is to open up the sound control panel. Then click on the adapter and click ‘properties’. Then go to the ‘enhancements’ tab and check ‘Bass Boost’ & ‘Virtual Surround’. Then go to the ‘Advanced’ tab and make it so the drop-down list selects ’16 bit, 48000Hz (DVD Quality)’ instead of the crappy CD quality. I found that the sound is higher in quality and sounds amazing compared to the built in one…

    Post your results in the comments :D

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  3. 78 of 81 people found the following review helpful
    4.0 out of 5 stars
    Works as described and installs easy!, May 6, 2009
    By 
    Eric (Portland, OR, USA) –

    This review is from: Syba SD-CM-UAUD USB Stereo Audio Adapter, C-Media Chipset, RoHS (Personal Computers)

    If you need a basic stereo speaker output and a mic input, this will probably suit your needs well.

    -Pros:
    It’s inexpensive, and it works as described.

    Installation couldn’t be easier – just plug it in, and a driver is set up automatically. It works equally well with Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Ubuntu Linux. I have used the 64-bit versions of each on my PC, and each recognized and set up this device when I plugged it in, without any extra effort on my part.

    This device is also thin enough that it doesn’t block USB ports that are above or below, unless they’re using a thick USB plug. However, it could block USB ports to the sides.

    -Cons:
    The audio output has a little bit if distortion, at least in my experience with it in Windows Vista 64-bit. Fortunately, at least in Windows Vista, you can use a different audio device for audio output.

    Also, the microphone input is mono. For musicians, this wouldn’t be suitable for making stereo recordings.

    -Other Thoughts:
    I bought this to use primarily as a microphone input, since the microphone input on my new PC does not work well. The microphone input on this device works very well. The microphone signal is loud and clear with no noise.

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