SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) Reviews

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SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100)

SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100)

  • Connects to your router so Sonos players can go anywhere in your home
  • Only required if your router is not in a place where you want to put a Sonos player
  • Extends the wireless range of your Sonos system
  • The Sonos system allows you to stream your music wirelessly to Sonos speakers throughout your home

Sonos Wireless BRIDGE

List Price: $ 49.00

Price: $ 24.95

Originally posted 2015-10-29 01:11:17. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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3 thoughts on “SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) Reviews

  1. 106 of 111 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Bold New Way to Listen to Music, July 13, 2010
    By 
    Matthew Schenker (Western Massachusetts) –
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    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) (Electronics)

    A few months ago, I decided to upgrade my music system. I began looking at CD “jukeboxes” that could load my entire collection. Along the way, I discovered the world of wireless music systems, and began researching them. Sonos seemed to be well-received, so I finally made the decision to purchase a ZoneBridge and a ZonePlayer 120. This setup has fulfilled every expectation I had for a new music system, and more. It’s an easy and pleasant way to listen to music you already own, and to discover new music.

    Below is my review of all the main benefits I see to this amazing system.

    1. System Setup
    Sonos offers many hardware options, but they all have a few things in common. A Sonos ZoneBridge connects to your computer – it “indexes” music on your hard drive and connects to the Internet for music services (more on that later), then it beams all this to a ZonePlayer, which is hooked up to speakers somewhere else in your home. It creates a wireless network dedicated just to music and does not interfere with other wireless devices. You can add more ZonePlayers, and they all pick up the same wireless signal and allow you to listen to your collection in multiple locations throughout your home.

    The ZonePlayer 120 has standard jacks for directly connecting speakers. You can also hook up an ethernet cable, if you want to stream music through a wire instead of using the wireless signal. Finally, the ZonePlayer 120 allows you to connect an analog device using standard RCA cables. For my setup, I just hooked up two speakers.

    To get ready for this system, you must rip all your physical CDs into a music library. This is the most time-consuming part of the process. But there is nothing unusual here. You can use iTunes to rip CDs into your library, just as you normally would. To get the best sound quality from the Sonos system, you should rip everything using “Apple lossless” format (instead of MP3). This is really easy to do in iTunes. Lossless is not required (you can use MP3s if you want) , but it’s better because you’ll get CD-quality sound.

    After you rip all your CDs into an iTunes library, you run the Sonos “Desktop Controller,” which comes free with Sonos systems. This is one of the easiest and most intuitive software applications I’ve ever used. Just tell it to set up your music library. It finds your iTunes collection and “indexes” it in the Sonos system. Depending on the size of your collection, this may take a little while. With my collection of about 400 CDs, indexing takes about three minutes.

    After that, there is an automated process where the software “locates” your ZoneBridge and ZonePlayer. On your computer screen, it literally shows a picture of the devices with arrows pointing at the buttons you need to press. In less than five minutes (seriously) the Sonos Desktop Controller can have the whole system done and ready to go.

    Other than that, you just decide whether you want to use one of Sonos’ remote controllers, or get the free Sonos app which runs on the iPhone or iPod Touch. I use the free app, and it it works great: I turn on the iPod Touch, click the “Sonos” icon, then scan my entire music collection and play anything, within a few seconds.

    2. The Listening Experience
    Of course, easy set up does not matter if the system doesn’t sound good. Well, Sonos sounds great. The music that plays through the ZonePlayer is CD quality (remember to rip in Apple lossless format). It’s as simple as that.

    There is about a three-second wait time when you first click on the icon on your controller, as the Sonos systems starts up. But after that, you can run through your collection without delay. I like how my music collection is suddenly organized alphabetically by artist, album, or track names. If you’re like me and have a large collection, this indexing of your music is itself a great improvement over looking through hundreds of CDs for the one you want! Of course, the accuracy of your index relies on the album and artist data you provide when ripping your CDs into your iTunes library.

    Once the music starts to play, it just works. I’ve never had interruptions due to wireless connection problems. While the music plays, you see album artwork on your controller, plus the standard play/pause/forward/rewind functions we’re all accustomed to. You can also create playlists.

    3. Music Discovery
    Of course, having your entire music collection easily accessible is great. But the Sonos system goes much further. I was pleasantly surprised after I started using my Sonos system to see some excellent music discovery options I had not known about before.

    Through the Sonos system, you can access Pandora (the free Internet radio service) and play it through your stereo speakers.

    You can also access radio stations from around the world and play them…

    Read more

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  2. 34 of 35 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Good for extending Sonos system. Also works as a wired access point for wifi network., January 17, 2010
    By 
    dblhoya (Washington, DC) –

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) (Electronics)

    I initially bought this because my router and my stereo were on opposite sides of my living room. It worked great and didn’t take up much room at all. After I moved, I was able to attach one of the ZonePlayers directly to the stereo, and I discovered I could use the ZoneBridge as an access point to provide wired ethernet ports at the other end of my house from my wireless router. I have a wired network printer that I can now put anywhere I want and use over the wireless network. Considering the price of other products designed specifically for this purpose, it’s actually a pretty good deal for that as well! Since other reviews make it clear that it works well for its intended function, I thought I would mention this unexpected bonus feature.

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  3. 55 of 63 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Limited wireless range, September 12, 2010
    By 
    Cosmic Renardo (Zurich, Switzerland) –

    This review is from: SONOS BRIDGE Instant Set-up Solution for SONOS Wireless Network (BR100) (Electronics)

    I bought a bridge and a player in order to play my iTunes music library from my computer (which is in a basement office) to powered speakers set up on our outdoor patio. The actual distance between the bridge/router and the player is maybe 30 meters but I live in Switzerland where houses typically have brick or concrete internal walls. The wireless signal reached the outdoor player at first but dropped out after a few minutes. After that, the player couldn’t be located on the system. I tried moving it around to places where it might better “see” the signal but with no effect. I brought it inside to the living room and it worked only if the player was right beside an open door. Here the distance from the bridge is maybe 20 meters. If I put it beside my stereo in order to use my stereo’s speakers, it’s invisible, I assume because the stereo is in a corner of the room that creates a “shadow” where the wireless can’t reach. So I guess I’ll have to wire up a network connection to the player and forget about the wireless, which is why I bought the system in the first place.

    Also, to connect computer speakers to a Sonos player requires a special cinch adapter that you need to buy separately. That was not really explained anywhere on the website.

    After reading a lot of the positive reviews and visiting the company website, I was under the impression that the Sonos wireless system was somehow more powerful than the wireless signal in my existing system. But I would say it’s actually a weaker signal, since I can easily use my laptop wirelessly on my balcony but the Sonos system doesn’t transmit that far.

    So take all the “easiest to use” stuff with a grain of salt. Once again, if you’re not a real techie, these solutions are rarely as easy to use as many claim, in my opinion. And to those hoping to have wireless connectivity in a building with thick walls, be forewarned that you may need to invest additional money either in an extra bridge unit or forget about wireless and go for a wired solution using network cables.

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