Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

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Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

  • New 15.1-megapixel CMOS sensor with DIGIC 4 Image Processor
  • Includes Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens
  • Full HD video capture at 1920 x 1080 resolution; HDMI output
  • 3.0-inch Clear View LCD; Live View Function for stills (Quick, Live and Face Detection AF modes) and video
  • Capture images and video to SD/SDHC memory cards (not included)

High Resolution Still Capture.New 15.1 Megapixel CMOS sensor with DIGIC 4 Image Processor for faster processing of fine detail and natural color reproduction, 14-bit A/D conversion for smooth color tones and gradations.Canon’s CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) sensor captures images with exceptional clarity and tonal range and offers the most pixels in its class. It offers many of the same new technologies as used by Canon’s professional cameras to maximize each pixel’s light gathering efficiency. Its APS-C size sensor creates an effective 1.6x field of view (compared to 35mm format). Canon’s DIGIC 4 Image Processor dramatically speeds up all camera operations for intuitive operation and offers improvements in both fine detail and natural color reproduction. It works in concert with the EOS Rebel T1i’s image sensor to achieve unprecedented levels of performance in all lighting situations.With the EOS Rebel T1i, analog to digital signal conversion is executed by a 14-bit pr

List Price: $ 574.95

Price: $ 574.95

Originally posted 2015-07-26 00:28:59. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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3 thoughts on “Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens

  1. 2,323 of 2,347 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A wonderfully full-featured camera at an unbeatable price, April 29, 2009
    By 
    Rimesh Patel (Washington D.C.) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Camera)

    I’ve had the T1i for about almost week now and after some extensive use, here are my thoughts:

    1. 15.1 megapixel sensor. Yes, the high megapixel count is impressive, but keep in mind that, as you approach higher resolutions, you need to ensure the lens on the SLR can resolve that much detail. Sadly, the included 18-55mm IS lens is functional, but the high resolution really shows the so-so quality of the lens. Even if taken at the proper focus, pictures can appear soft with this kit lens. Shots I have taken with Canon EF-S 17-85mm and EF 70-200mm L lenses are crisp. I don’t have any gripes on image quality. There are some issues with noise on the higher ISOs that don’t seem to show up on the Nikon digitals, but overall, the quality is amazing for the price. Skin tones, textures, colors are reproduced very accurately.

    2. Digic 4. The Digic 4 processor appears to process/save the 15 megapixel images in the same time (if not faster) than the Digic III processor on the XSi (even in RAW+Jpg mode). I have also noticed that at higher ISOs, the sensor and the Digic 4 produce images with less overall noise compared with its predecessors.

    3. LCD. The 920,000 pixel LCD screen is large (3″), crisp, vibrant and fully visible even in bright sunlight. In comparison, the Canon XSi SLR (which the T1i replaces), also has a 3″ LCD, but with 230,000 pixels. The viewing angle is great as well and the LCD can easily be seen nearly 180 degrees around.

    4. ISO 12800. Canon and Amazon are correctly identifying that the T1i maxes out at ISO 3200. Some less reputable dealers are listing an ISO 12800, which you should disregard. The ISO 6400 and 12800 settings are expanded ISO settings. The pictures taken on these two settings are ISO 3200 images pushed to ISO 6400 or 12800 by the Digic 4 chip before saving to the memory card. These pictures are extremely grainy and contain a lot of noise to the point of only being usable as for snapshots or adding an artistic effect to certain compositions.

    5. Penta-mirror. That Canon is still using one in the T1i is disappointing. The penta-mirror viewfinder image is functional, but still noticeably darker than that of the penta-prism viewfinder in the Nikon D90 (which is the T1i’s main competitor). I really would have preferred if Canon had kept the XSi’s 12.2 megapixel sensor, forgone 1080p video altogether, and maybe upped the cost of the camera slightly to cover the production cost of using a penta-prism in the T1i. Honestly, unless you are massively cropping your images, or creating large photos, the difference between 12.2 and 15.1 megapixels really is negligible.

    6. Size. This is the same body as the XSi, and therefore a bit on the smaller side compared to other digital SLRs. I have small hands, so the T1i is comfortable for me. If you have big hands, I can see this being a very difficult camera to use over an extended period of time. If you haven’t handled a Canon XT, XTi or XSi, I would suggest you go to a store and hold the T1i yourself before purchasing it online. (I will upload a picture of the T1i in my hands to the user gallery for a size reference.)

    7. HD Video. Yes, the Canon marketing department made a horrible marketing decision and pushed the T1i onto shelves limiting the 1080p recording to 20fps (frames per second). Recognize this as a marketing gimmick that allows them put a 1080p sticker on the camera box. The 1080p @ 20fps is fine most times, but seems a choppy if you have a lot of action in the frame or are panning quickly. The T1i’s 720p video is recorded at 30fps and is clean, smooth, and sufficient for all but the most discerning consumers. One major criticism though is that the sound is recorded in mono, AND there is NO input for an external microphone.

    A lot of pre-production reviews of the T1i criticize its inability to automatically autofocus while recording. I wouldn’t put much weight in this criticism, mostly because neither of the other two SLR cameras with HD recording capabilities (Canon 5D Mark II and Nikon D90) can automatically autofocus while recording either. What you can do with the T1i is pan/zoom the lens and then press the AE lock (*) button to make the camera autofocus on the new subject (all while recording). A problem with using the AE lock button to have the camera autofocus is that the microphone for the camera is on the front upper left of the body near the lens mount. Therefore, the lens motor noise is picked up just as much as ambient sounds. Even with my quietest Canon USM (ultasonic motor) lenses, this lens motor sound is pretty loud in video playback. Although, remember, you can always manually turn the focusing ring on the lens to get your subject back into focus. It’s not easy, but after a little practice, it’s not all too hard, either.

    Ultimately, you shouldn’t let the HD recording limitations sway you one way or the other. This is an SLR camera…

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  2. 289 of 300 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    First hands on experience…Very positive!, April 29, 2009
    This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Camera)

    Here’s a quick, first impressions (from hands on shooting) of the Rebel T1i. Although we’ll need more scientific examinations to determine ultimate image quality and usability, I’ll try to give a hint into the camera’s potential.

    I’ll not go in to any real detail on the kit lens, which has been well reviewed. Let’s just agree that $100 for a good quality IS (image stabalized) lens is a very reasonable value it you don’t have another option. There are no obvious reasons this kit lens should make or break your choice of this camera over a competitor’s.

    Styling and build wise, the T1i is an XSi made over, which is not a bad thing. Some found that camera to be a bit on the small size for their hands, or a bit lacking in weight, but most like the size and weight (include me). It uses the same, proven battery and accessories of the XSi. I’ve already used some generic batteries that worked well in an XSi, with similar good results, but I do not want to lump all generics in the “good to go” category.

    In using the camera, the first thing you’ll notice over the previous Rebels in the marvelous LCD screen. Yep, the images look much cleaner even at the original size. Don’t get confused if you compare this camera side-by-side and think it’s images are all that much better. They just look much better on such a sharp LCD.

    First looks at IQ (Image Quality) were very impressive. I tried using the camera in a variety of situtations (biased to how I would use it), and got very good results throughout. Focusing was typical for a better Rebel, and images looked good throughout the ISO range, based on reasonable expectations. I thought the Auto White Balance is a very good job compared to previous results I’d had with Canons in general. They weren’t perfect, but the tungsten areas seemed to look better than average. All in all, I’d say Canon made reasonable progress with the jump to 15 meg, but probably no reason to trade-in your XSi.

    Live View never has been one of my biggest thrills, but the sharp LCD makes it a bit more enjoyable. If I was still shooting macros, I would like it much more.

    But the biggest advantage of the newer screen for some will be while shooting videos. I only did videos in the 1080p mode, and was impressed by the quality. Sound was OK, and I was a bit disappointed that Canon doesn’t have an option audio input (ala the 5D mkII or camcorders with intellegent shoe). I’m also not sure how practical the videos will be, considering they aren’t using a “direct to HiDef player” format like AVCHD or AVCHD Lite. Also, 20fps is a bit odd for 1080p, but their software does support frame grapping, which should give nice 4×6 prints (there’s a bit more than 2meg per frame). The 720p is recorded in a more standard 30fps, which should also help with moving subjects. You can also shoot a full 15meg image while recording your videos. You videos are interrupted for about a second (you’ll see a still image for that length in the video playback), but the high quality image will be recorded in its own file (no need to frame grab). BTW, autofocusing did work during this recording, but the noise was picked up by the mic.

    OK, so I liked the camera, but how would I rate it compared to the competition. Well, compared to the XSi, it’s better, but maybe not worth the money. The LCD is grand (that alone would get my money), and it’s a no brainer if you need video or shoot lots of macros. But with resent price drops and combo deals from Canon, the XSi should still be strong based on value.

    I’ve also had a bit of experience with the new Nikon D5000 (but even less so). Although initial pricing is about $50 higher on the T1i, I thought the Canon was clearly more interesting. I like the way Sony incorporated an articulated LCD, but hate it on the D5000. I was constantly setting the camera down with the LCD back being the first thing to touch. You might never break it, but you’ll surely scratch the cosmetics. The D5000 doesn’t have the motor built into the body, so there’s a bit of a limitation to lens. However, the biggest drawback was that the D5000’s built-in flash doesn’t support their wireless flash system (with their new lineup, we’ll have to move up to the D90). The D5000 really needs to be lined up against the XSi, not the T1i.

    The 14mp Sony Alpha 350 might be a good value oriented competitor (when Sony offers bundles), but the IQ of the Canon’s CMOS sensor is probably better in most moderate to low light conditions. I think you’ll be seeing something soon to replace this model.

    Thus, it’s prime competitors should be Canon’s own XSi, the D5000 (especially if they drop the price about $100 more), and for those with a bit more money, the Nikon D90.

    The T1i carries on the tradition of Canon Rebels with a lot of “curbside appeal” matched with solid performance.

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  3. 513 of 558 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Video Problems with some sdhc cards (especially Kingston), You may miss some good shots unless you use sandisk extreme lll., May 4, 2009
    By 
    smithnwesson “Tom” (Kalifornia) –

    This review is from: Canon EOS Rebel T1i 15.1 MP CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 3-Inch LCD and EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (Camera)

    **see update below, now give this camera a 4 star
    **** Video Test memory consumption rates and max minutes per clip contained below.

    I couldn’t wait to my hands on the new Canon T1i. It was a stretch for my budget but had most of the 5d mkll features. I was excited. I pre-ordered a body (I already have 2 xti’s and lenses) but the only the kits are/were available so I upgrade to get it before a SciFi convention I attended.
    Higher iso and video, for the less than optimal lighting in the hall where the Celebs were speaking, attracted me.
    I tested the video for memory consumption rate the day I got it, no problem for a 20 minute test run. I saw a little white bar on the right side of the screen appear get a little bigger, then disappear. I figured it was a buffer level. Next day at the convention during Jeri Ryan’s appearance I took a few stills and flipped into the video mode, nice…. until it stopped after a few minutes. Set it back up, pushed record again a few minutes later stopped, no warning, no beep, just stopped. Try again, now I notice the buffer bar reaches the top, it stops. I am using a kingston 8 gig class 6 sdhc, freshly formatted by the camera. That sucks! I missed a lot of good video because this new marvelous camera can’t write fast enough. This occured on 2 different but identical cards so I thought the camera was having problems. It was on the 720p mode, 1080 mode could only go 8 seconds.

    ****Update—I talked to Canon, to make a long story short, this camera is a bit finicky about which cards you put in it. Both kingston class 6 (fastest class) had problems, tried a kingston micro class 4 (slower) 4 gig and it worked fine, tried 2 Polaroid/pny 8 gig class 4’s and they worked fine with only 1 buffer bar appearing occasionally, even on 1080. Canon guy seemed to like the sandisk brand. This begs the question of how can a class 4 work better than the class 6? I have a sandisk extreme III on order and will update this info if I have more problems with that.
    My wrath now turns to Kingston, who service has been xlnt.
    ***update kingston- I returned a card to kingston, they sent a new one just as bad as the slow originals, which indicates ALL this type kingston are mot going to work in this camera for video.

    ******Another update, with a Sandisk 8 Gb Extreme lll card the video worked fine, no buffer bar at all. Perhaps there should be a recommended list of sdhc cards so others don’t have the trouble I did.

    That said, I was able to test the video as follows:
    I have tested my T1i for memory usage in video mode, here are the results using a Sandisk 8 Gig Extreme III:

    T1i Video Memory Usage Rates for a 1 minute file.

    1080 mode 282 MB
    720 mode 194 MB
    480 mode 131MB

    Following is for 5 minute file
    1080 = 1,383 MB
    720 = 988 MB
    480 = 638

    Any 1 clip can be 4GB max, so the following is an approximate max clip length

    1080 about 14 minutes
    720 about 20 minutes
    480 about 30 minutes

    These figures are approximate as the content of the video will affect the compression and amount of memory actually used but these are pretty close to an average time you should expect. I did a little rounding so these are probably the on the low side you may get a little more time, but not much, maybe a minute.

    You can shoot as much video as the card will hold, just any 1 uninterrupted clip cannot be longer than 4 gig.

    Shooting Video also eats the battery, buy extras, one Battery per every 8 gig card should be about right.

    Bottom line-MAKE SURE you thoroughly test and ‘season’ the memory card BEFORE counting on getting complete videos. The first cards I tried did work on day 1 for 20 minutes but the buffer bar got to 3 or 4. Day 2 (the convention) was a different story, you read it above. DO NOT use KINGSTON CARDS.

    Stills are pretty good but I noticed on blowing them up the noise almost looks like dusty distorted scratchy marks on the sensor, not just the colored freckles. My XTi is better, My Nikon d200 is better, my Nikon d40 is better in the noise department. I cranked up the iso to speed up my shutter and some of the shots looked like very dirty/dusty slides I have from the 70’s. I guess you can choose between the noise or slow shutter speed with the movement blur, or both. See the customer images for a sample of the noise at 6400 iso.

    ****update on stills
    Still shot Capacity on 8 gig card
    Large + RAW =286
    Just RAW = 359
    Large = 1375
    Medium = 2334
    Small = 4175
    * if you shoot any video mixed with the stills these numbers drop very fast.

    Other review sites had a pre-release version of this camera and they had the same video problem, (they did not name the sdhc card they were using, but I’d bet it was a kingston). Unfortunately there were not any reviews of…

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