Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC)

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Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC)

Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station - M8930LL/A (MAC/PC)

  • Features a compatibility mode that automatically supports not just the AirPort Extreme Card (at data rates up to 54Mbps)

Apple Airport Extreme Round Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A. 802.11B/G protocol For MAC or PC.

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Originally posted 2015-12-06 01:22:23. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

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3 thoughts on “Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC)

  1. 25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    It’s a cute little guy, May 13, 2003
    By 
    NutMac “NutMac” (Mountain View, CA) –
    (VINE VOICE)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC) (Electronics)
    I’ve been using Linksys BEFW11S4 802.11b router for few years now. Other than somewhat short range, it has never let me down. After looking at cheaper alternatives, I bought the AirPort Extreme Base Station (AEBS) as my second WiFi router.
    Pros:
    – Looks really really really cute… and small, too
    – Better signal strength than Linksys BEFW11S4
    – Innovative USB printer support
    – Superb AirPort Admin Utility and tight Mac OS X integration
    – Bridging with other WiFi station via WDS (for expanding the range)
    – Wall mountable (comes with wall mounting kit)
    – AOL and RADIUS server support
    Cons:
    – Susceptible to signal loss (i.e., when using the microwave oven)
    – Pricier than most 802.11g router
    – No web-based configuration interface
    – Only 1 LAN port
    When you run the AirPort Admin Utility for the first time, it might detect an older firmware and proceed to upgrade itself automatically (if you let it, of course). The new firmware (5.0.4 as I write this) fixes WiFi connection drop issue. For some strange reason, the problem persisted until I manually downloaded and uploaded the latest firmware. I’ve tinkered with the channel selection to get the optimum results. Running the microwave oven may cause WiFi connection to drop still, however.
    The AirPort Admin Utility is a pleasure to use, which is also full of features. Among the options are choosing among 11 WiFi channels; operating in 802.11b, 802.11g or mix mode; setting the transmission power from 10 to 100%; setting up Internet via DHCP, static IP, PPPoE, or AOL DSL; and mapping ports. You can improve security via 40-bit or 128-bit WEP, create a closed network by hiding SID (Station ID), and add access control (MAC address filtering).
    By the way, if you are running Windows, go to Apple’s web site and download the AirPort Admin Utility for Windows. It does not specify AEBS, but trust me… it works.
    Oh, did I mention how beautiful AEBS is? I tucked my ugly Linksys where no one can see (which probably hinders WiFi broadcast), but not so with AEBS. Located on the front are beautiful metallic Apple logo and three graphite status indicators (WiFi, power, and Ethernet). Located on the rear are reset button, 100/10BASE-T WAN port, 100/10BASE-T LAN port, USB printer port, and AC power adapter port (very long power cable is included). If you need more than one LAN port, you will need to mate AEBS with an Ethernet hub.
    The signal level’s stronger than Linksys BEFW11S4. I get full signal virtually everywhere in my apartment, including those where Linksys frequently gave up. If you need greater range (larger house), consider bridging ABES with another ABES via built-in WDS support (Wireless Distribution System) or purchase ABES with Modem and Antenna Port (and one of few external ABES antennas available).
    Finally, I must mention its built-in USB printer port. Hookup one of many supported printers via USB and you will be able to print wirelessly via Mac OS X’s Rendezvous feature. Neat!

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  2. 13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Share broadband between Mac & PC, June 22, 2003
    By 
    Roland Reinhart “Roland” (New Jersey, USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC) (Electronics)
    It hurt to pay so much, but I had the feeling that getting the Airport Extreme Base Station would save me time and headaches when trying to share broadband between a PC and Mac.
    I was successful with this platform/OS/equipment combination:
    Apple M8930LL/A Airport Extreme Base Station
    Mac: OS 10.1.5, Apple Airport Card
    PC: Win2000 Pro, NetGear MA101 Wireless USB Adapter
    Plugged an ISP-provided DSL modem into the Base Station and configured the Base Station using the Mac. (Had no success with Apple’s Airport Admin config software for the PC.)
    Then plugged in the NetGear MA101 on the PC, installed the software from CD, and configured the settings to match the Mac security.
    I got strong signal strength and throughput from both the NetGear MA101 and the Airport Card in a three story house.
    40-bit WEP works fine. 128-bit is occasionally a little buggy on the PC, requiring me to temporarily reset both platforms to 40-bit.
    Haven’t tried setting up file sharing yet, but will attempt the USB printer connection on the Base Station. (Caution, check Apple.com/airport for list if approved USB printers that will work with the Base Station. Also, this USB printer feature supposedly requires the Mac to run OS 10.2.3+)
    I wish the Airport Base Station manual had more scenario details and suggestions how to tailor your WAN configuration. I spent a lot of time searching the Apple BBS regarding questions I think should have been covered in the manual.
    Overall, the Airport Extreme Base Station is a thing of beauty to look at, relatively easy to configure — but I’m scared to death of someone knocking it to the floor.

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  3. 15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
    3.0 out of 5 stars
    Extreme Wireless, February 28, 2003
    By A Customer
    This review is from: Apple Airport Extreme Wireless Base Station – M8930LL/A (MAC/PC) (Electronics)
    The Extreme Airport Base Station is in theory a step up in speed from the Graphite and Snow stations. Speed is now up to 54Mps, but real-time tests will show much slower speeds and most people will never realize the speed difference over the graphite and snow models because even broadband cannot equal the top speeds of the new station. But, you still need 802.11g, then keep reading.
    The new stations come with two Ethernet ports and use the 802.11g frequency in addition to being downward compatible with 802.11b stations, cards, and networks. So, you can have an extreme base station and an older airport card. The speed will be limited to 11 mps, but it works.
    The stations come in two models. The more expensive model also has a dialup modem and can be used to DIAL IN into networks when you are on the road or outside your home or office. This is a big advantage over the Ethernet model and should justify the extra [$$] or so. At least Apple lowered the prices to [$$$] and [$$$], but they are still overpriced compared to like models. However, if still have a dialup connection and need a network at home or for a small business, the modem model would be hard to pass up.
    One drawback to the Extreme stations are range. They are limited to 50 feet, whereas, the Graphite and Snow stations have ranges of up to 150 feet. The Extreme models can be outfitted with externel antennas (to extend range) from Mac specialists Dr. Bott or others, but this comes with an added price. Unless your computers stay within 50 of the base station you will need an antenna.
    Another problem that some people have experienced is interference with phones and microwave signals. Apple recently updated the firmware on this Station to help with the problem. Some early stations also had problems keeping the signal. The updated firmware is supposed to solve this as well.
    Overall, these stations in theory are faster and the price is almost the same as the Snow station. However, there have been problems with firmware, interference, and the short range. Problems that firmware should fix (sans the range).
    Although, the range is not considered a problem (and firmware won’t fix that), but a short-coming. If you need to be on the 802.11g frequency and you love Apple for their easy solutions and setup, get this station.
    This station also works well with Windows PCs and Windows users should not shy away just because it has an Apple logo.
    Compare with D-link and Linkys 802.11g routers and base stations.

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